A longitudinal study of growth, sex steroids and IGF-1 in boys with physiological gynaecomastia

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A longitudinal study of growth, sex steroids and IGF-1 in boys with physiological gynaecomastia. / Mieritz, Mikkel G.; Raket, Lars Lau; Hagen, Casper P.; Nielsen, John E.; Talman, Maj-Lis Møller; Petersen, Jørgen Holm; Sommer, Stefan Horst; Main, Katharina Maria; Jørgensen, Niels; Juul, Anders.

I: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Bind 100, Nr. 10, 2015, s. 3752-3759.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Mieritz, MG, Raket, LL, Hagen, CP, Nielsen, JE, Talman, M-LM, Petersen, JH, Sommer, SH, Main, KM, Jørgensen, N & Juul, A 2015, 'A longitudinal study of growth, sex steroids and IGF-1 in boys with physiological gynaecomastia', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, bind 100, nr. 10, s. 3752-3759. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2015-2836

APA

Mieritz, M. G., Raket, L. L., Hagen, C. P., Nielsen, J. E., Talman, M-L. M., Petersen, J. H., ... Juul, A. (2015). A longitudinal study of growth, sex steroids and IGF-1 in boys with physiological gynaecomastia. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 100(10), 3752-3759. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2015-2836

Vancouver

Mieritz MG, Raket LL, Hagen CP, Nielsen JE, Talman M-LM, Petersen JH o.a. A longitudinal study of growth, sex steroids and IGF-1 in boys with physiological gynaecomastia. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2015;100(10):3752-3759. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2015-2836

Author

Mieritz, Mikkel G. ; Raket, Lars Lau ; Hagen, Casper P. ; Nielsen, John E. ; Talman, Maj-Lis Møller ; Petersen, Jørgen Holm ; Sommer, Stefan Horst ; Main, Katharina Maria ; Jørgensen, Niels ; Juul, Anders. / A longitudinal study of growth, sex steroids and IGF-1 in boys with physiological gynaecomastia. I: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2015 ; Bind 100, Nr. 10. s. 3752-3759.

Bibtex

@article{12fa2c4509134eeca58279da9896bd91,
title = "A longitudinal study of growth, sex steroids and IGF-1 in boys with physiological gynaecomastia",
abstract = "Context: Physiological gynaecomastia is common and affects a large proportion of otherwise healthy adolescent boys. It is thought to be caused by an imbalance between estrogen and testosterone, though this is rarely evident in analyses of serum. Objective: This study aimed to describe the frequency of physiological gynaecomastia, and to determine possible etiological factors (e.g. auxology and serum hormone levels) in a longitudinal set-up. Design, Settings and Participants: A prospective cohort study of 106 healthy Danish boys (5.8–16.4 years) participated in the longitudinal part of “the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study”. The boys were examined every six months during an eight year follow-up. Median number of examinations was 10 (2–15). Main outcome measurements: Blood samples and analysed for FSH, LH, testosterone, estradiol, SHBG, inhibin B, AMH, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 by immunoassays. Auxological parameters, pubertal development and the presence of gynaecomastia were evaluated at each visit. Results: 52 of 106 boys (49 developed gynaecomastia of which 10 (19 presented with intermittent gynaecomastia. Boys with physiological gynaecomastia reached peak height velocity at a significantly younger age than boys who did not develop gynaecomastia (13.5 vs 13.9 years, p = 0.027), and they had significantly higher serum levels of IGF-I (p = 0.000), estradiol (p = 0.013), free-testosterone (p <0.001) and FSH (p = 0.030) during pubertal transition. However, no differences in serum LH or in the estradiol to testosterone ratio were found. Conclusions: Gynaecomastia is frequent in pubertal boys. Increased IGF-I levels and pubertal growth appear to be associated, whereas changes in estrogen to testosterone ratio seem negligible.",
author = "Mieritz, {Mikkel G.} and Raket, {Lars Lau} and Hagen, {Casper P.} and Nielsen, {John E.} and Talman, {Maj-Lis M{\o}ller} and Petersen, {J{\o}rgen Holm} and Sommer, {Stefan Horst} and Main, {Katharina Maria} and Niels J{\o}rgensen and Anders Juul",
note = "PMID: 26287961",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1210/jc.2015-2836",
language = "English",
volume = "100",
pages = "3752--3759",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism",
issn = "0021-972X",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A longitudinal study of growth, sex steroids and IGF-1 in boys with physiological gynaecomastia

AU - Mieritz, Mikkel G.

AU - Raket, Lars Lau

AU - Hagen, Casper P.

AU - Nielsen, John E.

AU - Talman, Maj-Lis Møller

AU - Petersen, Jørgen Holm

AU - Sommer, Stefan Horst

AU - Main, Katharina Maria

AU - Jørgensen, Niels

AU - Juul, Anders

N1 - PMID: 26287961

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Context: Physiological gynaecomastia is common and affects a large proportion of otherwise healthy adolescent boys. It is thought to be caused by an imbalance between estrogen and testosterone, though this is rarely evident in analyses of serum. Objective: This study aimed to describe the frequency of physiological gynaecomastia, and to determine possible etiological factors (e.g. auxology and serum hormone levels) in a longitudinal set-up. Design, Settings and Participants: A prospective cohort study of 106 healthy Danish boys (5.8–16.4 years) participated in the longitudinal part of “the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study”. The boys were examined every six months during an eight year follow-up. Median number of examinations was 10 (2–15). Main outcome measurements: Blood samples and analysed for FSH, LH, testosterone, estradiol, SHBG, inhibin B, AMH, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 by immunoassays. Auxological parameters, pubertal development and the presence of gynaecomastia were evaluated at each visit. Results: 52 of 106 boys (49 developed gynaecomastia of which 10 (19 presented with intermittent gynaecomastia. Boys with physiological gynaecomastia reached peak height velocity at a significantly younger age than boys who did not develop gynaecomastia (13.5 vs 13.9 years, p = 0.027), and they had significantly higher serum levels of IGF-I (p = 0.000), estradiol (p = 0.013), free-testosterone (p <0.001) and FSH (p = 0.030) during pubertal transition. However, no differences in serum LH or in the estradiol to testosterone ratio were found. Conclusions: Gynaecomastia is frequent in pubertal boys. Increased IGF-I levels and pubertal growth appear to be associated, whereas changes in estrogen to testosterone ratio seem negligible.

AB - Context: Physiological gynaecomastia is common and affects a large proportion of otherwise healthy adolescent boys. It is thought to be caused by an imbalance between estrogen and testosterone, though this is rarely evident in analyses of serum. Objective: This study aimed to describe the frequency of physiological gynaecomastia, and to determine possible etiological factors (e.g. auxology and serum hormone levels) in a longitudinal set-up. Design, Settings and Participants: A prospective cohort study of 106 healthy Danish boys (5.8–16.4 years) participated in the longitudinal part of “the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study”. The boys were examined every six months during an eight year follow-up. Median number of examinations was 10 (2–15). Main outcome measurements: Blood samples and analysed for FSH, LH, testosterone, estradiol, SHBG, inhibin B, AMH, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 by immunoassays. Auxological parameters, pubertal development and the presence of gynaecomastia were evaluated at each visit. Results: 52 of 106 boys (49 developed gynaecomastia of which 10 (19 presented with intermittent gynaecomastia. Boys with physiological gynaecomastia reached peak height velocity at a significantly younger age than boys who did not develop gynaecomastia (13.5 vs 13.9 years, p = 0.027), and they had significantly higher serum levels of IGF-I (p = 0.000), estradiol (p = 0.013), free-testosterone (p <0.001) and FSH (p = 0.030) during pubertal transition. However, no differences in serum LH or in the estradiol to testosterone ratio were found. Conclusions: Gynaecomastia is frequent in pubertal boys. Increased IGF-I levels and pubertal growth appear to be associated, whereas changes in estrogen to testosterone ratio seem negligible.

U2 - 10.1210/jc.2015-2836

DO - 10.1210/jc.2015-2836

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26287961

VL - 100

SP - 3752

EP - 3759

JO - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

JF - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

SN - 0021-972X

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 143085758