Hypersensitivity to pain in congenital blindness

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Hypersensitivity to pain in congenital blindness. / Slimani, Hocine; Danti, Sabrina; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Pietrini, Pietro; Ptito, Maurice; Kupers, Ron.

I: Pain, Bind 154, Nr. 10, 2013, s. 1973-8.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Slimani, H, Danti, S, Ricciardi, E, Pietrini, P, Ptito, M & Kupers, R 2013, 'Hypersensitivity to pain in congenital blindness', Pain, bind 154, nr. 10, s. 1973-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pain.2013.05.036

APA

Slimani, H., Danti, S., Ricciardi, E., Pietrini, P., Ptito, M., & Kupers, R. (2013). Hypersensitivity to pain in congenital blindness. Pain, 154(10), 1973-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pain.2013.05.036

Vancouver

Slimani H, Danti S, Ricciardi E, Pietrini P, Ptito M, Kupers R. Hypersensitivity to pain in congenital blindness. Pain. 2013;154(10):1973-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pain.2013.05.036

Author

Slimani, Hocine ; Danti, Sabrina ; Ricciardi, Emiliano ; Pietrini, Pietro ; Ptito, Maurice ; Kupers, Ron. / Hypersensitivity to pain in congenital blindness. I: Pain. 2013 ; Bind 154, Nr. 10. s. 1973-8.

Bibtex

@article{77d907cf46f84a9fbeb394b2c03b41f9,
title = "Hypersensitivity to pain in congenital blindness",
abstract = "Vision is important for avoiding encounters with objects in the environment that may imperil physical integrity. We tested whether, in the absence of vision, a lower pain threshold would arise from an adaptive shift to other sensory channels. We therefore measured heat and cold pain thresholds and responses to suprathreshold heat stimuli in 2 groups of congenitally blind and matched normal-sighted participants. We also assessed detection thresholds for innocuous warmth and cold, and participants' attitude toward painful encounters in daily life. Our results show that, compared to sighted subjects, congenitally blind subjects have lower heat pain thresholds, rate suprathreshold heat pain stimuli as more painful, and have increased sensitivity for cold pain stimuli. Thresholds for nonpainful thermal stimulation did not differ between groups. The results of the pain questionnaires further indicated that blind subjects are more attentive to signals of external threats. These findings indicate that the absence of vision from birth induces a hypersensitivity to painful stimuli, lending new support to a model of sensory integration of vision and pain processing.",
keywords = "Adult, Aged, Blindness, Cold Temperature, Female, Hot Temperature, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pain, Pain Measurement, Pain Threshold, Sensitivity and Specificity, Young Adult",
author = "Hocine Slimani and Sabrina Danti and Emiliano Ricciardi and Pietro Pietrini and Maurice Ptito and Ron Kupers",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1016/j.pain.2013.05.036",
language = "English",
volume = "154",
pages = "1973--8",
journal = "Pain",
issn = "0304-3959",
publisher = "IASP Press",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hypersensitivity to pain in congenital blindness

AU - Slimani, Hocine

AU - Danti, Sabrina

AU - Ricciardi, Emiliano

AU - Pietrini, Pietro

AU - Ptito, Maurice

AU - Kupers, Ron

N1 - Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Vision is important for avoiding encounters with objects in the environment that may imperil physical integrity. We tested whether, in the absence of vision, a lower pain threshold would arise from an adaptive shift to other sensory channels. We therefore measured heat and cold pain thresholds and responses to suprathreshold heat stimuli in 2 groups of congenitally blind and matched normal-sighted participants. We also assessed detection thresholds for innocuous warmth and cold, and participants' attitude toward painful encounters in daily life. Our results show that, compared to sighted subjects, congenitally blind subjects have lower heat pain thresholds, rate suprathreshold heat pain stimuli as more painful, and have increased sensitivity for cold pain stimuli. Thresholds for nonpainful thermal stimulation did not differ between groups. The results of the pain questionnaires further indicated that blind subjects are more attentive to signals of external threats. These findings indicate that the absence of vision from birth induces a hypersensitivity to painful stimuli, lending new support to a model of sensory integration of vision and pain processing.

AB - Vision is important for avoiding encounters with objects in the environment that may imperil physical integrity. We tested whether, in the absence of vision, a lower pain threshold would arise from an adaptive shift to other sensory channels. We therefore measured heat and cold pain thresholds and responses to suprathreshold heat stimuli in 2 groups of congenitally blind and matched normal-sighted participants. We also assessed detection thresholds for innocuous warmth and cold, and participants' attitude toward painful encounters in daily life. Our results show that, compared to sighted subjects, congenitally blind subjects have lower heat pain thresholds, rate suprathreshold heat pain stimuli as more painful, and have increased sensitivity for cold pain stimuli. Thresholds for nonpainful thermal stimulation did not differ between groups. The results of the pain questionnaires further indicated that blind subjects are more attentive to signals of external threats. These findings indicate that the absence of vision from birth induces a hypersensitivity to painful stimuli, lending new support to a model of sensory integration of vision and pain processing.

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Blindness

KW - Cold Temperature

KW - Female

KW - Hot Temperature

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Pain

KW - Pain Measurement

KW - Pain Threshold

KW - Sensitivity and Specificity

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.1016/j.pain.2013.05.036

DO - 10.1016/j.pain.2013.05.036

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 24040972

VL - 154

SP - 1973

EP - 1978

JO - Pain

JF - Pain

SN - 0304-3959

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 119765875