Resource Analysis for Parallel and Distributed Coordination – University of Copenhagen

Resource Analysis for Parallel and Distributed Coordination

COPLAS Talk with Hans Wolfgang Loidl, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh

Abstract:

Predicting the resources that are consumed by a program component is crucial for many parallel or distributed systems. In this context the main resources of interest are execution time, space, and communication/synchronisation costs. There has recently been significant progress in resource analysis technology, notably in type-based analyses and abstract interpretation. At the same time, parallel and distributed computing are becoming increasingly important.

This talk gives an overview of several successful resource analyses structured around a general model of resource analysis. We investigate why these analyses have been effective in their area, identifying general principles for successful application in the context of parallel programming. We will then elaborate on these principles by examining a type-based resource analysis in more detail.

The talk is based on joint work with: P.W. Trinder, M.I. Cole, K. Hammond, S. Jost, G.J. Michaelson.

Bio:

Dr. Hans Wolfgang Loidl is programme director for the MSc in Computer Services Management as well as coordinator of the SICSA sub-theme SEMANTICS on high-level parallel computation.

His primary research interest lies in the area of functional programming, covering foundations, program analysis, language design, (parallel) implementation, and applications with particular interest in symbolic computation and embedded systems as application domains for functional languages and techniques.

Academic background: An MSc degree from Johannes Kepler University in Austria in 1992, and a PhD degree from the University of Glasgow in 1998.  From 1999 to 2002 he worked as a postdoctoral research fellow of the Austrian Academy of Sciences at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, on architecture-independent parallelism. From 2002 to 2009 postdoctoral researcher in the Theoretical Computer Science group at Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich on the EU-funded projects MRG and EmBounded.

Since 2009 lecturer at the School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences of Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh.