Are Supramodality and Cross-Modal Plasticity the Yin and Yang of Brain Development? From Blindness to Rehabilitation

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Are Supramodality and Cross-Modal Plasticity the Yin and Yang of Brain Development? From Blindness to Rehabilitation. / Cecchetti, Luca; Kupers, Ron; Ptito, Maurice; Pietrini, Pietro; Ricciardi, Emiliano.

I: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, Bind 10, 89, 08.11.2016.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Cecchetti, L, Kupers, R, Ptito, M, Pietrini, P & Ricciardi, E 2016, 'Are Supramodality and Cross-Modal Plasticity the Yin and Yang of Brain Development? From Blindness to Rehabilitation', Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, bind 10, 89. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2016.00089

APA

Cecchetti, L., Kupers, R., Ptito, M., Pietrini, P., & Ricciardi, E. (2016). Are Supramodality and Cross-Modal Plasticity the Yin and Yang of Brain Development? From Blindness to Rehabilitation. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, 10, [89]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2016.00089

Vancouver

Cecchetti L, Kupers R, Ptito M, Pietrini P, Ricciardi E. Are Supramodality and Cross-Modal Plasticity the Yin and Yang of Brain Development? From Blindness to Rehabilitation. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience. 2016 nov 8;10. 89. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2016.00089

Author

Cecchetti, Luca ; Kupers, Ron ; Ptito, Maurice ; Pietrini, Pietro ; Ricciardi, Emiliano. / Are Supramodality and Cross-Modal Plasticity the Yin and Yang of Brain Development? From Blindness to Rehabilitation. I: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience. 2016 ; Bind 10.

Bibtex

@article{873c5b8ffff64b39a7480801a749608b,
title = "Are Supramodality and Cross-Modal Plasticity the Yin and Yang of Brain Development? From Blindness to Rehabilitation",
abstract = "Research in blind individuals has primarily focused for a long time on the brain plastic reorganization that occurs in early visual areas. Only more recently, scientists have developed innovative strategies to understand to what extent vision is truly a mandatory prerequisite for the brain’s fine morphological architecture to develop and function. As a whole, the studies conducted to date in sighted and congenitally blind individuals have provided ample evidence that several “visual” cortical areas develop independently from visual experience and do process information content regardless of the sensory modality through which a particular stimulus is conveyed: a property named supramodality. At the same time, lack of vision leads to a structural and functional reorganization within “visual” brain areas, a phenomenon known as cross-modal plasticity. Cross-modal recruitment of the occipital cortex in visually deprived individuals represents an adaptative compensatory mechanism that mediates processing of non-visual inputs. Supramodality and cross-modal plasticity appears to be the “yin and yang” of brain development: supramodal is what takes place despite the lack of vision, whereas cross-modal is what happens because of lack of vision. Here we provide a critical overview of the research in this field and discuss the implications that these novel findings have for the development of educative/rehabilitation approaches and sensory substitution devices (SSDs) in sensory-impaired individuals.",
keywords = "rehabilitation, blindness, supramodal, crossmodal, sensory substitution, fMRI, MRI",
author = "Luca Cecchetti and Ron Kupers and Maurice Ptito and Pietro Pietrini and Emiliano Ricciardi",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
day = "8",
doi = "10.3389/fnsys.2016.00089",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience",
issn = "1662-5137",
publisher = "Frontiers Research Foundation",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are Supramodality and Cross-Modal Plasticity the Yin and Yang of Brain Development? From Blindness to Rehabilitation

AU - Cecchetti, Luca

AU - Kupers, Ron

AU - Ptito, Maurice

AU - Pietrini, Pietro

AU - Ricciardi, Emiliano

PY - 2016/11/8

Y1 - 2016/11/8

N2 - Research in blind individuals has primarily focused for a long time on the brain plastic reorganization that occurs in early visual areas. Only more recently, scientists have developed innovative strategies to understand to what extent vision is truly a mandatory prerequisite for the brain’s fine morphological architecture to develop and function. As a whole, the studies conducted to date in sighted and congenitally blind individuals have provided ample evidence that several “visual” cortical areas develop independently from visual experience and do process information content regardless of the sensory modality through which a particular stimulus is conveyed: a property named supramodality. At the same time, lack of vision leads to a structural and functional reorganization within “visual” brain areas, a phenomenon known as cross-modal plasticity. Cross-modal recruitment of the occipital cortex in visually deprived individuals represents an adaptative compensatory mechanism that mediates processing of non-visual inputs. Supramodality and cross-modal plasticity appears to be the “yin and yang” of brain development: supramodal is what takes place despite the lack of vision, whereas cross-modal is what happens because of lack of vision. Here we provide a critical overview of the research in this field and discuss the implications that these novel findings have for the development of educative/rehabilitation approaches and sensory substitution devices (SSDs) in sensory-impaired individuals.

AB - Research in blind individuals has primarily focused for a long time on the brain plastic reorganization that occurs in early visual areas. Only more recently, scientists have developed innovative strategies to understand to what extent vision is truly a mandatory prerequisite for the brain’s fine morphological architecture to develop and function. As a whole, the studies conducted to date in sighted and congenitally blind individuals have provided ample evidence that several “visual” cortical areas develop independently from visual experience and do process information content regardless of the sensory modality through which a particular stimulus is conveyed: a property named supramodality. At the same time, lack of vision leads to a structural and functional reorganization within “visual” brain areas, a phenomenon known as cross-modal plasticity. Cross-modal recruitment of the occipital cortex in visually deprived individuals represents an adaptative compensatory mechanism that mediates processing of non-visual inputs. Supramodality and cross-modal plasticity appears to be the “yin and yang” of brain development: supramodal is what takes place despite the lack of vision, whereas cross-modal is what happens because of lack of vision. Here we provide a critical overview of the research in this field and discuss the implications that these novel findings have for the development of educative/rehabilitation approaches and sensory substitution devices (SSDs) in sensory-impaired individuals.

KW - rehabilitation

KW - blindness

KW - supramodal

KW - crossmodal

KW - sensory substitution

KW - fMRI

KW - MRI

U2 - 10.3389/fnsys.2016.00089

DO - 10.3389/fnsys.2016.00089

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27877116

VL - 10

JO - Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience

JF - Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience

SN - 1662-5137

M1 - 89

ER -

ID: 169440170