Cooperative epistemic work in medical practice: an analysis of physicians' clinical notes

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Cooperative epistemic work in medical practice : an analysis of physicians' clinical notes. / Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling Carl; Schmidt, Kjeld; Mønsted, Troels; Petersen, Helene Høgh; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup.

I: Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Bind 25, Nr. 6, 2016, s. 503-546.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Bansler, JP, Havn, EC, Schmidt, K, Mønsted, T, Petersen, HH & Svendsen, JH 2016, 'Cooperative epistemic work in medical practice: an analysis of physicians' clinical notes', Computer Supported Cooperative Work, bind 25, nr. 6, s. 503-546. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10606-016-9261-x

APA

Bansler, J. P., Havn, E. C., Schmidt, K., Mønsted, T., Petersen, H. H., & Svendsen, J. H. (2016). Cooperative epistemic work in medical practice: an analysis of physicians' clinical notes. Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 25(6), 503-546. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10606-016-9261-x

Vancouver

Bansler JP, Havn EC, Schmidt K, Mønsted T, Petersen HH, Svendsen JH. Cooperative epistemic work in medical practice: an analysis of physicians' clinical notes. Computer Supported Cooperative Work. 2016;25(6):503-546. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10606-016-9261-x

Author

Bansler, Jørgen P. ; Havn, Erling Carl ; Schmidt, Kjeld ; Mønsted, Troels ; Petersen, Helene Høgh ; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup. / Cooperative epistemic work in medical practice : an analysis of physicians' clinical notes. I: Computer Supported Cooperative Work. 2016 ; Bind 25, Nr. 6. s. 503-546.

Bibtex

@article{6b320c3a70964f1286b2722766d1046c,
title = "Cooperative epistemic work in medical practice: an analysis of physicians' clinical notes",
abstract = "We examine an important part of the medical record that has not been studied extensively: physicians’ clinical notes. These notes constitute an explanatory medical narrative that documents the patient’s illness trajectory by combining each physician’s notes into a common text. Although several prior CSCW studies have addressed the role of the medical record in patient care, they have not dealt specifically with the role, structure, and content of these notes. In this article, we present a detailed analysis of a set of physicians’ clinical notes recording the acute hospitalization and subsequent treatment of a patient with chronic heart disease. We show that clinical notes are highly structured and conventionalized texts that promote conciseness while at the same time allowing physicians to express themselves in a precise and nuanced way. Based on this analysis, we argue that physicians’ clinical notes form the core of the medical record. They serve both as a ‘tool for thinking’ for the individual physician, enabling him or her to make sense of the patient’s past history and current condition, and as a coordinative artifact used by physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals. We conclude by discussing the implications of this research for the design of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems.",
author = "Bansler, {J{\o}rgen P.} and Havn, {Erling Carl} and Kjeld Schmidt and Troels M{\o}nsted and Petersen, {Helene H{\o}gh} and Svendsen, {Jesper Hastrup}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1007/s10606-016-9261-x",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "503--546",
journal = "Computer Supported Cooperative Work",
issn = "0925-9724",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cooperative epistemic work in medical practice

T2 - an analysis of physicians' clinical notes

AU - Bansler, Jørgen P.

AU - Havn, Erling Carl

AU - Schmidt, Kjeld

AU - Mønsted, Troels

AU - Petersen, Helene Høgh

AU - Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - We examine an important part of the medical record that has not been studied extensively: physicians’ clinical notes. These notes constitute an explanatory medical narrative that documents the patient’s illness trajectory by combining each physician’s notes into a common text. Although several prior CSCW studies have addressed the role of the medical record in patient care, they have not dealt specifically with the role, structure, and content of these notes. In this article, we present a detailed analysis of a set of physicians’ clinical notes recording the acute hospitalization and subsequent treatment of a patient with chronic heart disease. We show that clinical notes are highly structured and conventionalized texts that promote conciseness while at the same time allowing physicians to express themselves in a precise and nuanced way. Based on this analysis, we argue that physicians’ clinical notes form the core of the medical record. They serve both as a ‘tool for thinking’ for the individual physician, enabling him or her to make sense of the patient’s past history and current condition, and as a coordinative artifact used by physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals. We conclude by discussing the implications of this research for the design of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems.

AB - We examine an important part of the medical record that has not been studied extensively: physicians’ clinical notes. These notes constitute an explanatory medical narrative that documents the patient’s illness trajectory by combining each physician’s notes into a common text. Although several prior CSCW studies have addressed the role of the medical record in patient care, they have not dealt specifically with the role, structure, and content of these notes. In this article, we present a detailed analysis of a set of physicians’ clinical notes recording the acute hospitalization and subsequent treatment of a patient with chronic heart disease. We show that clinical notes are highly structured and conventionalized texts that promote conciseness while at the same time allowing physicians to express themselves in a precise and nuanced way. Based on this analysis, we argue that physicians’ clinical notes form the core of the medical record. They serve both as a ‘tool for thinking’ for the individual physician, enabling him or her to make sense of the patient’s past history and current condition, and as a coordinative artifact used by physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals. We conclude by discussing the implications of this research for the design of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems.

U2 - 10.1007/s10606-016-9261-x

DO - 10.1007/s10606-016-9261-x

M3 - Journal article

VL - 25

SP - 503

EP - 546

JO - Computer Supported Cooperative Work

JF - Computer Supported Cooperative Work

SN - 0925-9724

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 168249515