Technology Acceptance and User Experience: A Review of the Experiential Component in HCI

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Technology Acceptance and User Experience: A Review of the Experiential Component in HCI. / Hornbæk, Kasper; Hertzum, Morten.

In: A C M Transactions on Computer - Human Interaction, Vol. 24, No. 5, 33, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Hornbæk, K & Hertzum, M 2017, 'Technology Acceptance and User Experience: A Review of the Experiential Component in HCI', A C M Transactions on Computer - Human Interaction, vol. 24, no. 5, 33. https://doi.org/10.1145/3127358

APA

Hornbæk, K., & Hertzum, M. (2017). Technology Acceptance and User Experience: A Review of the Experiential Component in HCI. A C M Transactions on Computer - Human Interaction, 24(5), [33]. https://doi.org/10.1145/3127358

Vancouver

Hornbæk K, Hertzum M. Technology Acceptance and User Experience: A Review of the Experiential Component in HCI. A C M Transactions on Computer - Human Interaction. 2017;24(5). 33. https://doi.org/10.1145/3127358

Author

Hornbæk, Kasper ; Hertzum, Morten. / Technology Acceptance and User Experience: A Review of the Experiential Component in HCI. In: A C M Transactions on Computer - Human Interaction. 2017 ; Vol. 24, No. 5.

Bibtex

@article{d6a80302be774841830da6505292d94f,
title = "Technology Acceptance and User Experience: A Review of the Experiential Component in HCI",
abstract = "Understanding the mechanisms that shape the adoption and use of information technology is central to human-computer interaction. Two accounts are particularly vocal about these mechanisms, namely the technology acceptance model (TAM) and work on user experience (UX) models. In this study we review 37 papers in the overlap between TAM and UX models to explore the experiential component of human-computer interactions. The models provide rich insights about what constructs influence the experiential component of human-computer interactions and about how these constructs are related. For example, the effect of perceived enjoyment on attitude is stronger than those of perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. It is less clear why the relations exist and under which conditions the models apply. We discuss four of the main theories used in reasoning about the experiential component and, for example, point to the near absence of psychological needs and negative emotions in the models. In addition, most of the reviewed studies are not tied to specific use episodes, thereby bypassing tasks as an explanatory variable and undermining the accurate measurement of experiences, which are susceptible to moment-to-moment changes. We end by summarizing the implications of our review for future research.",
keywords = "Faculty of Humanities, Usability, User experience, technology acceptance",
author = "Kasper Hornb{\ae}k and Morten Hertzum",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1145/3127358",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
journal = "A C M Transactions on Computer - Human Interaction",
issn = "1073-0516",
publisher = "Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Technology Acceptance and User Experience: A Review of the Experiential Component in HCI

AU - Hornbæk, Kasper

AU - Hertzum, Morten

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Understanding the mechanisms that shape the adoption and use of information technology is central to human-computer interaction. Two accounts are particularly vocal about these mechanisms, namely the technology acceptance model (TAM) and work on user experience (UX) models. In this study we review 37 papers in the overlap between TAM and UX models to explore the experiential component of human-computer interactions. The models provide rich insights about what constructs influence the experiential component of human-computer interactions and about how these constructs are related. For example, the effect of perceived enjoyment on attitude is stronger than those of perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. It is less clear why the relations exist and under which conditions the models apply. We discuss four of the main theories used in reasoning about the experiential component and, for example, point to the near absence of psychological needs and negative emotions in the models. In addition, most of the reviewed studies are not tied to specific use episodes, thereby bypassing tasks as an explanatory variable and undermining the accurate measurement of experiences, which are susceptible to moment-to-moment changes. We end by summarizing the implications of our review for future research.

AB - Understanding the mechanisms that shape the adoption and use of information technology is central to human-computer interaction. Two accounts are particularly vocal about these mechanisms, namely the technology acceptance model (TAM) and work on user experience (UX) models. In this study we review 37 papers in the overlap between TAM and UX models to explore the experiential component of human-computer interactions. The models provide rich insights about what constructs influence the experiential component of human-computer interactions and about how these constructs are related. For example, the effect of perceived enjoyment on attitude is stronger than those of perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. It is less clear why the relations exist and under which conditions the models apply. We discuss four of the main theories used in reasoning about the experiential component and, for example, point to the near absence of psychological needs and negative emotions in the models. In addition, most of the reviewed studies are not tied to specific use episodes, thereby bypassing tasks as an explanatory variable and undermining the accurate measurement of experiences, which are susceptible to moment-to-moment changes. We end by summarizing the implications of our review for future research.

KW - Faculty of Humanities

KW - Usability

KW - User experience

KW - technology acceptance

U2 - 10.1145/3127358

DO - 10.1145/3127358

M3 - Journal article

VL - 24

JO - A C M Transactions on Computer - Human Interaction

JF - A C M Transactions on Computer - Human Interaction

SN - 1073-0516

IS - 5

M1 - 33

ER -

ID: 184287814